How Do I Measure My Product?

Understanding Dimension Orientation:

A question that we get a lot is “How do I measure my product?”   In this short tutorial we will give you some tips of how our boxes are laid out, as well as how to measure your product to find the box that you would like.

First thing is to understand how the dimensions are laid out on the box and how to relay those to find the style and look of a box that you are looking for. Our boxes are laid out with the dimensions as the following:

The Length (L) Dimension: This would be the panel that your customer sees first, when your product is on the shelf. It would be from left to right. This would be considered the front and back panels.

The Width (W) Dimension: This would be the side panels when your product is on the shelf. This would go from front to back.

The Depth (D) Dimension: This would be the “height” of your box. This would dictate where the openings are. Think (bout the box like it is filled with water, the depth would be top to bottom from the opening.
The “names” of these orientations can cause some people confusion with where they correspond to the box. So this is the easiest explanation we can give to help you with the understanding.

Measuring Your Product for a Box:

First thing is to do is to measure the dimensions of what is going in the box. Because we live in a three-dimensional world, all products should have three measurements. For the examples below, we will measure a bar of soap and a 30ml/1oz. Boston Round with a dropper.

Measure your product

First the bar of soap. Because soap shrinks as it cures, you are going to want to make sure to measure it when itʼs close to finished shrinking. This way you wonʼt measure and get a box, only to find out that it is too large. So you start with the 2nd largest dimension. This will be our Length dimension. Then me(sure the smallest dimension for the Width dimension. Then the longest dimension will be our Depth dimension. This will give you the 3 dimensions you need. To find a box in our library you would add 1/16” to each of your dimensions. We have found this gives the best (mount of room for your product without being too loose. In the pictures below, we kept everything in 1/16” to make the math easier!

Measure your product

Length Measurement

Measure your product

Width Measurement

Depth Measurement

Measure your product

Length and Width Measurement

Measure your product

Depth Measurement

Measure your product

Add 1/16” to Each of Your Dimensions

Now using the same principles for a product that is a cylinder. You would want to measure the diameter of the widest part of your container. This will be your Length and Width dimension. Then measure the height of your container for the Depth dimension. Make sure to measure this with the cap on. If you measure without the cap physically on, and try to guess at what that will be the sizing will not come out correctly and the boxes might not fit.

Please let us know if you have any further questions or to receive your free samples.

 

 

 

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